Posts tagged CPH

The Biblical and Theological Foundations for Mission — Regional Directors’ Meeting

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Rev. Dr. Klaus Detlev Schultz Teaching “Biblical and Theological Foundations for Mission”

Saint Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House

January 26-28, 2015

The Regional Directors, representing Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, gathered at Concordia Publishing House’s Gerber Room for continuing education on missiology with Rev. Dr. Klaus Detlev Schultz, Professor of Pastoral Ministry and Missions from Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne. Dr. Schultz serves as the Dean of the Graduate School and Director of the Ph.D. in Missiology program at the Fort Wayne Seminary. The Office of International Mission (OIM) and Concordia Theological Seminary have formed a partnership to provide advanced missiology training to LCMS missionaries. The initial pilot program began with the Regional Directors, even allowing them to take the classes for credit toward the Ph.D. in missiology. After the completion of the pilot project, LCMS missionaries will be able to take seven classes toward a “certificate in missiology.”  Dr. Lawrence Rast, President of Concordia Theological Seminary, noted, “The partnership between the Office of International Mission (OIM)  and Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, has been a model of collaboration for missionary training. OIM has significant human resources and missionary experience. CTSFW’s expertise in missiology is undergirded by one of the premier Ph.D. programs in missiology in the world. Together, they are able to resource the church and its mission in ways beyond what either could do on its own.”

At CPH, the Regional Directors are taking Module 2: Biblical and Theological Foundations for Mission. This particular course explores the historical genius and the theological discussion on the concept of missio Dei, the Lutheran contribution to that concept, the overall missiological direction of theology, and the relationship of church / congregation and mission.” A significant portion of the class focused on the relationship between  church and congregations (modalities) and mission societies (sodalities). The class also examined and critiqued Alan Hirsch’s apostolicity model (that apostolic leadership needs to be revived today in the church) from Ephesians 4:3. A portion of the class also discussed the relatively recent use of the term “missional” and how Lutheran theologians can contribute to the discussion. Dr. Schultz said of the class, “Coming together around the table as theologians and as missionaries, and then interacting with one another on theology and field experiences is how we can best further our mission for the future. We cannot forego reflection on mission just as much as we cannot abstain from practicing it.”

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Rev. Theodore Krey, Regional Director for Latin America, remarked, “Dr. Schultz’s engaging lectures are challenging OIM’s Regional directors to think through missiology and its centrality in the theology of the church. The goal of missions is through the Lord’s Word to incorporate people into the body of Christ, which is to bring people into a worshiping community where they can receive the Lord’s saving gifts.” President Matthew Harrison joined the class for a time to see how the missionaries were receiving continuing education. President Harrison said to the Regional Directors, “I am proud of the work you are doing. Now is a unique moment in time for mission.”

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Dr. Bruce Kintz, President of Concordia Publishing House, also joined the sessions. He attended the first missiology class that Dr. Schultz taught in the Dominican Republic in October 2014. Dr. Kintz said, “I have heard many times how CPH resources remain long after LCMS missionaries move on to a new area. Getting to know the missionaries in the field has helped CPH create the resources missionaries need.” Over the past year, the collaboration between OIM and CPH has increased dramatically. Kintz said, “Having been to one Regional Directors’ meeting in the Dominican Republic, I felt compelled to invite the Regional Directors to CPH for their next meeting. They will be able to see first hand our materials, to see how our associates work together to create them and gain valuable input into the creation of additional resources.”

In addition to the missiological continuing education, the Regional Directors will work on OIM’s strategic plan and budgeting for the next year. The week concludes with the Regional Directors attending the ALMA meeting and the BIM meeting on Friday and Saturday.

(The Course Syllabus)

 

CPH Missionary Gift Registry

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Concordia Publishing House (CPH) in cooperation with the Office of International Mission (OIM) has launched a Missionary Gift Registry to benefit the work of sharing the Gospel overseas. In a joint meeting between the LCMS Regional Directors and Dr. Bruce Kintz of CPH, the Regional Directors asked if CPH could find a way to help missionaries get CPH materials onto the mission field, where emerging churches could make use of the material. CPH created a webpage that contains a list of materials LCMS missionaries would like to sue on the mission field with partner churches, emerging churches, and converts to the Christian faith. The web address is https://www.cph.org/t-international-missions.aspx

 

Each quarter the regional directors will update the list and provide CPH with a list of needed resources. CPH also is working with LCMS missionaries to identify resources to translate into other languages. Please take a look at the CPH site created to help our LCMS missionaries.

 

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The CPH website helpfully shows the regions of the world where the LCMS works and provides the name of the regional director.

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This is part of the Latin America list of needed resources. As the image shows, a number of resources have been identified with the quantity required and the amount fulfilled.

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Eurasia is looking to get LSB hymnals for the Old Latin School in Wittenberg.

 

Thanks CPH for working with the Office of International Mission on this. It is a great way to collaborate.

 

— Rev. Albert B. Collver, Ph.D, Director of Church Relations / Regional Operations

Homily on Matthew 27:32–54

The following sermon, which was delivered today (April 9, 2014) in chapel at the LCMS International Center, is adapted from a sermon written by Chaplain William Weedon. The sermon is one of many included in a Lenten series published by Concordia Publishing House (CPH) in 2009 titled Sacred Head, Now Wounded. Find this resource (which includes a CD) here

How many the wounds we inflicted upon our Savior in His Passion, suffering and death! And yet of all the wounds that our Lord received, none so struck, so terrorized and so weighed on Him as the one we ponder this morning. We did not inflict this one. It came from His Father — the wound of abandonment.

From out of the unspeakable depth of His agony on the cross, our Lord cries the words of Psalm 22:

“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

The great Lutheran preacher, O.P. Kretzmann, ponders this cry of agony:

“Suddenly on a Friday afternoon a man was forsaken of God, cut off from the land of the living and the dead, utterly and ultimately alone. … The sudden emptiness in those shadowed eyes … . It was then, much more than afterward, that he died. … You see, this is sin. … It is not merely a matter of murder and adultery and gossip. … Something to do or not to do! … It is always loneliness. … It is cutting yourself off from God. … It is deliberate turning away from truth, from goodness, from heaven. … You see, this is redemption. … All this He took into Himself alone there in the dark. … He became sin for us” (The Pilgrim, CPH 1944, p. 47).

People loved by God, as all the sin of the world is laid upon the Lamb of God, as He owns it as His very own, He experiences in Himself what every one of those sins demands: “Leave me alone, God! Go away! Leave me be!” This is the bitterest dregs of the cup that He will drain down for us in its entirety. He will taste hell. He will taste it for us all. He will know the loneliness so profound that its pain is unutterable for us. How can we begin to understand what it was like for Him in that moment — the eternal Word who had delighted in the Father’s presence before the ages came to be; the eternal Word who took on flesh from the Virgin without ever leaving the presence of His Father; the Word made flesh who lived among us constantly as all men were meant to live: conscious of His Father’s never-failing love and the presence of His guiding hand. And all of this is now withdrawn, and He is alone. All alone.

People joke about hell, saying, “Well, at least I’ll have a lot of company there.” Wrong. Utterly wrong. Think of the parable of Lazarus and the rich man. In that story, the rich man is all alone. Lazarus has angels for company and Abraham to whom he is so close that he lays his head in his bosom. The rich man hungers and thirsts for a human touch.

“Send Lazarus to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue, for I am in anguish in this flame.”

But no visit relieves the terror of his solitude. He is alone. All alone. And will be alone forever. You ponder that and you will begin to understand the reality of hell. You ponder that and you will see its true terror. You ponder that and you will bow in love before the Savior whose love for you was so great that He chose to enter that Himself and to endure it in your place that you might be set free from it forever. Never alone. Never again.

Because He endured the wound of abandonment that our every sin demands of God, because He drained the cup down to this, its last and bitterest dregs, you can look to your Savior and pray with the confidence of being heard.

Do you see it now? You will never have to know what He went through in those darkest hours. Not that you won’t suffer. No, He flat out tells you that you will. But you will never have to face life or suffering or death alone. He has made sure of it. He will be with you. He will walk with you every step of the way, and so hell itself is undone, death destroyed, sin forgiven. Your Savior, your Shepherd, He attends you through the valley of the shadow of death so that you fear no evil, for you are not alone, but He is with you. His rod and His staff, they comfort you. He brings you out from that darkest of valleys into the sunshine and the bright light of the day that never ends in the Kingdom of your Father.

Let’s let O.P. Kretzmann have the final words on this meditation on the wound of abandonment:

“Above His ‘Eli, Eli’ was the sound of tearing veils, of falling walls, of the glad crying of those who now had a home again after the long loneliness of sin. … They would continue to wander, groping, stumbling, falling, in all the black ways which man will walk when they turn away from God. … But there was a way back now, beyond Jerusalem and beyond thought and hope to the place where the open arms of the cross had become the gates of heaven” (The Pilgrim, p. 47).

Amen.

 William Weedon
LCMS International Center chaplain

 

The Diaconate of the Ancient & Medieval Church

The Diaconate of the Ancient & Modern Church

Yesterday, I received my copy of a new book from Concordia Publishing House, The Diaconate of the Ancient & Medieval Church by Caspar Ziegler. The book was translated by Richard Dinda with a Forward by Matthew C. Harrison. The editors were Charles P. Schaum and Albert B. Collver. The book provides a detailed history of deacons and deaconesses in the Church. It is an invaluable read if you are interested in this topic.

From the book jacket:

Caspar Ziegler details how Christians have shown mercy to a lost and dying world from apostolic times to the Reformation.

Ziegler’s detailed study engages at least 500 primary sources to illustrate expertly the life of the Church as recorded and discussed by interpreters of canon law. That explains the underlying tradition of the Lutheran Confessions and helps answer the question, “Why do we do that?” Indeed, by showing differences between Western and Eastern traditions, Ziegler points out medieval problems that helped lead to the Reformation. He appeases the Lutheran tradition in light of the greater Western context, resulting in a greater appreciation of both.

Order the Book at CPH here: The Diaconate of the Ancient & Medieval Church CPH Order

Download the Book to your Kindle here: The Diaconate of the Ancient & Modern Church Kindle Edition

 

 

 

Latest from CPH: The What?

As a child attending Lutheran school, I remember our annual parading outside the school building on October 31, all children, pastors, and staff lining up on the west side of the building (facing the Roman Catholic church four blocks away) and singing “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God” very loudly. It was an example of how we felt about things “Catholic” in those days. I guess we were hoping that our voices would carry those four blocks to their church and school in some meaningful way.

This aversion to things “Catholic” included the Bible they used. It included “extra books” that didn’t belong there, and we children knew better than ever to touch one of those Bibles, much less open it and read from it, lest our attention wander over to “those books.” At least such was my take from those childhood days.

I mention this to demonstrate how things have changed. Over the years, our attitude has softened considerably toward the Roman church. Not always, of course, as when key doctrinal differences are considered. But with a number of other important issues (e.g., abortion, homosexuality), we often recognize a closer affinity with the Roman Catholic Church than with those who share our name “Lutheran.”

And now, courtesy of Concordia Publishing House with its recent release of The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition With Notes, another old fence has come down. I was pleased to be asked to provide a review of this Lutheran publication of “those books” and did so from the perspective of one who has watched 60 years pass since singing as loud as I could every October 31 outside our Lutheran school.

This publication by CPH is far more than yet another sign of the softening of inter-church attitudes. This bold bringing of these intertestamental writings out of the shadows is a major gift to the Lutheran and Protestant world. It not only signals that these writings, rightly understood, are okay to read. It makes available to both clergy and laity alike an important aid for the study of the Bible itself. It provides a first-hand look into the historical context that God Himself regarded as “the fullness of time” (Gal. 4:4).

In his introduction to the publication, LCMS 3rd Vice-President Paul Maier writes, “Not only does [The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition With Notes] offer an unfailingly accurate translation of the various texts involved, via the English Standard Version, but it is also replete with scholarly notes and commentary to assist the reader–lay or professional–in every way possible….Simply put, this book belongs in every serious library, be that collection Evangelical, Protestant, Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, or Jewish. Why? No reply could be better than the introduction to the Apocrypha in the German Lutheran Bible: ‘Apocrypha, that is, books which are not held equal to the sacred Scriptures, and nevertheless are useful and good to read.'”

We are truly blessed as a Synod to have a publishing house in our corner of our Lord’s kingdom to provide a host of materials that we can confidently use to do the work of His Church on earth. And we are blessed with CPH leadership that looks continually for opportunities to provide helpful resources, such as The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes.

Raymond Hartwig

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