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Dr. Quill Recovery Update

Dr. Quill Recovery Update

For Immediate Release

April 23, 2014

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (CTS)—In this season as we celebrate the resurrection of Christ, it is with thanksgiving to the God of all mercy and comfort that we are able to announce that the Rev. Dr. Timothy Quill has been discharged from the hospital. His road to recovery will continue in Adelaide, Australia. While a date has yet to be set for Dr. Quill’s return to the United States, we pray for his continued recovery and look forward to his homecoming.

Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, and The Office of International Mission of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod continue to give thanks for the marvelous care, both physical and spiritual, that the Quill family is receiving. We further encourage all to keep the Quill’s and those providing care for them in your prayers.

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Location:N Seminary Ter,Clayton,United States

Timothy Quill Update Week 2

Adelaide, Australia, April 11, 2014

The Rev. Dr. Timothy Quill, Associate Professor of Pastoral Ministry and Missions at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne (CTS) and Director of Theological Education for The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod’s (LCMS) Office of International Mission (OIM), remains in the Royal Adelaide Hospital in Adelaide, South Australia, where he underwent surgery for a brain aneurism on April 3.

Quill’s condition has improved over the past several days. He has been released from the Intensive Care Unit and is now being cared for in the Neurology Ward. While he remains in serious condition, his condition is slowly improving.

Although the physicians have yet to provide a prognosis regarding Quill’s ultimate recovery, they have indicated that he is in the category of a more positive outcome for people who have suffered such an aneurysm. While physical therapy has begun, it is likely that Dr. Quill will remain in Australia for some time in preparation for his return to the United States.

Annette and Kati, Quill’s wife and daughter, are in Adelaide, lending invaluable emotional support. OIM staff and pastors from the Lutheran Church of Australia will remain with the Quill’s throughout the recovery period to provide spiritual and logistical support. The CTS community is also actively engaged in supporting and caring for the Quill family during this challenging time.

Updates on Dr. Quill’s recovery will be provided as information becomes available. Please keep Tim, his family, and his medical and pastoral care teams in your prayers.

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Location:Barton Terrace E,North Adelaide,Australia

Homily on Matthew 27:32–54

The following sermon, which was delivered today (April 9, 2014) in chapel at the LCMS International Center, is adapted from a sermon written by Chaplain William Weedon. The sermon is one of many included in a Lenten series published by Concordia Publishing House (CPH) in 2009 titled Sacred Head, Now Wounded. Find this resource (which includes a CD) here

How many the wounds we inflicted upon our Savior in His Passion, suffering and death! And yet of all the wounds that our Lord received, none so struck, so terrorized and so weighed on Him as the one we ponder this morning. We did not inflict this one. It came from His Father — the wound of abandonment.

From out of the unspeakable depth of His agony on the cross, our Lord cries the words of Psalm 22:

“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

The great Lutheran preacher, O.P. Kretzmann, ponders this cry of agony:

“Suddenly on a Friday afternoon a man was forsaken of God, cut off from the land of the living and the dead, utterly and ultimately alone. … The sudden emptiness in those shadowed eyes … . It was then, much more than afterward, that he died. … You see, this is sin. … It is not merely a matter of murder and adultery and gossip. … Something to do or not to do! … It is always loneliness. … It is cutting yourself off from God. … It is deliberate turning away from truth, from goodness, from heaven. … You see, this is redemption. … All this He took into Himself alone there in the dark. … He became sin for us” (The Pilgrim, CPH 1944, p. 47).

People loved by God, as all the sin of the world is laid upon the Lamb of God, as He owns it as His very own, He experiences in Himself what every one of those sins demands: “Leave me alone, God! Go away! Leave me be!” This is the bitterest dregs of the cup that He will drain down for us in its entirety. He will taste hell. He will taste it for us all. He will know the loneliness so profound that its pain is unutterable for us. How can we begin to understand what it was like for Him in that moment — the eternal Word who had delighted in the Father’s presence before the ages came to be; the eternal Word who took on flesh from the Virgin without ever leaving the presence of His Father; the Word made flesh who lived among us constantly as all men were meant to live: conscious of His Father’s never-failing love and the presence of His guiding hand. And all of this is now withdrawn, and He is alone. All alone.

People joke about hell, saying, “Well, at least I’ll have a lot of company there.” Wrong. Utterly wrong. Think of the parable of Lazarus and the rich man. In that story, the rich man is all alone. Lazarus has angels for company and Abraham to whom he is so close that he lays his head in his bosom. The rich man hungers and thirsts for a human touch.

“Send Lazarus to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue, for I am in anguish in this flame.”

But no visit relieves the terror of his solitude. He is alone. All alone. And will be alone forever. You ponder that and you will begin to understand the reality of hell. You ponder that and you will see its true terror. You ponder that and you will bow in love before the Savior whose love for you was so great that He chose to enter that Himself and to endure it in your place that you might be set free from it forever. Never alone. Never again.

Because He endured the wound of abandonment that our every sin demands of God, because He drained the cup down to this, its last and bitterest dregs, you can look to your Savior and pray with the confidence of being heard.

Do you see it now? You will never have to know what He went through in those darkest hours. Not that you won’t suffer. No, He flat out tells you that you will. But you will never have to face life or suffering or death alone. He has made sure of it. He will be with you. He will walk with you every step of the way, and so hell itself is undone, death destroyed, sin forgiven. Your Savior, your Shepherd, He attends you through the valley of the shadow of death so that you fear no evil, for you are not alone, but He is with you. His rod and His staff, they comfort you. He brings you out from that darkest of valleys into the sunshine and the bright light of the day that never ends in the Kingdom of your Father.

Let’s let O.P. Kretzmann have the final words on this meditation on the wound of abandonment:

“Above His ‘Eli, Eli’ was the sound of tearing veils, of falling walls, of the glad crying of those who now had a home again after the long loneliness of sin. … They would continue to wander, groping, stumbling, falling, in all the black ways which man will walk when they turn away from God. … But there was a way back now, beyond Jerusalem and beyond thought and hope to the place where the open arms of the cross had become the gates of heaven” (The Pilgrim, p. 47).

Amen.

 William Weedon
LCMS International Center chaplain

 

Edmonton seminary to honour German bishop

(From the Canadian Lutheran)
 
 


APRIL 3, 2014 NO COMMENT
 The Rev. Hans-Jörg Voigt, Bishop of the Independent Evangelical Lutheran Church of Germany
 EDMONTON—The Rev. Hans-Jörg Voigt, Bishop of the Independent Evangelical Lutheran Church of Germany (SELK), will receive the honourary Doctor of Divinity degree at Concordia Lutheran Seminary’s Sacred Convocation in late May. News of the seminary faculty’s action in granting this honour was recently announced by Dr. James Gimbel, CLS president.
 
 Bishop Voigt, a native of the former communist East Germany, served as a parish pastor for 13 years before his election as SELK leader in 2006. In 2010 he became chairman of the International Lutheran Council (ILC), an association of confessional churches around the world. Despite the modest size of his church body, he has become prominent – especially in the past year – for his very courageous witness in support of historic Christian teaching on marriage, and in opposition to abortion on demand. His 2013 Pastoral Letter “Discovering Marriage and Family as Gifts of God” and other public actions won him recognition as “2013 Bishop of the Year” by an interdenominational Christian news service in his country, and more recently a “Declaration of Respect” by the Association of Christian Publicists.
 
  ”Concordia Lutheran Seminary is grateful for the opportunity to publicly acknowledge the courageous leadership and ministry of Bishop Voigt,” noted President Gimbel, in announcing this recognition. “In our global age, partnerships are critically important for a faithful adherence to and proclamation of God’s Word for our world. The presence of the Missionary Study Centre at our seminary, and the extensive work done by our faculty in delivering theological education to Ukraine, southeast Asia, and elsewhere testifies to our love of Christ’s mission, not only in Canada, but throughout the world. We hope to form a new generation of pastors as courageous servants of Christ in season and out of season, wherever God has placed us. We thank God for partners and models like Bishop Voigt, and appreciate this chance to highlight his leadership and witness.”
 
 The Sacred Convocation, at which Bishop Voigt is to be honoured, begins at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, May 30 at the Tegler Centre of Concordia University College of Alberta, directly next door to the seminary. This annual event marks the close of the academic year, and is highlighted by the conferral of academic degrees, as well as the distribution of vicarages and candidate calls. It is a public event, to which pastors, deacons and lay people from LCC congregations are invited.
 
 Concordia Lutheran Seminary, one of the two theological schools maintained by Lutheran Church–Canada (LCC), was founded in 1984 and has taken a leading role in the academic and spiritual preparation of pastors, especially in the two western districts of LCC.
 
 
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Location:Barton Terrace E,North Adelaide,Australia

Suffer the little children

But Jesus said, Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. Matthew 19:14

Last week I had the privilege of attending the groundbreaking of Concordia International School in Hanoi, Vietnam. During my trip, I had the opportunity to speak with parents and school board members who expressed their deep appreciation for the LCMS’ work in Vietnam. It was an experience that I will always remember and cherish.

Most memorable, however, were the teachers called to teach and lead the students of this school and others in the region. Their dedication to the Gospel, to the Church, and to the children they disciple humbled me. They are but a small sample of the men and women who serve in hundreds of parochial schools across our nation and the world — men and women who are shaping the next generation of our church.

The Lutheran ethos of our Synod is always in the hands of those who disciple the next generation of church leaders, and our teachers are often at the center of that activity. Their faithful years of service and long hours of work, in and out of the classrooms, sustain the Synod’s most precious resource, the children who will someday teach, preach, evangelize, and care for the Church.

Their work is truly an investment in the future — with phenomenal dividends; yet, children in our society, and in our Synod, face ever-growing spiritual challenges with eternal consequences. Satan is not a respecter of persons, at any age. Can there be a more sinister plan of attack than to strike at the children of the Church?

Jesus suffered the little children to come unto Him. These words from Matthew’s gospel resonate with profound meaning today. The Savior rescued children from sin and death by His atoning work on the cross. It is the Church’s privilege to nurture these young believers in the faith at the earliest age less they fall victim to the ploys of the devil.

Parents, pastors, and teachers all have vital roles to play in caring for the spiritual wellbeing of our children. Each brings the gospel to children in their respective roles. Teachers, in many cases, spend more hours with children than do parents. Can we not but pray for and encourage these teachers? May it always be so.

God grants His grace and mercy to the Church. He gifts His Church with teachers. May our Lord Jesus Christ continue to call faithful teachers to nurture and prepare our children for faithful lives in service to Him. Amen.

Gregory K. Williamson
Chief Mission Officer
LCMS

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